Chamber Members Supporting Chamber Members

by Admin 24. June 2015 07:54

Five Hole for Food is coming to Winnipeg, July 11. Over the past three years, FHFF has raised in excess of 500,000 pounds of food in support of local food banks across Canada. Armed with national partners, the unwavering support of over 40 volunteers and an identity borne from social media, FHFF is bringing together communities across Canada by using hockey as a vehicle for social change, and reaching a new generation of social entrepreneurs.

There are two main ways to get involved:

REGISTER A TEAM

Bring your office mates and have some hockey fun all for a great cause on Saturday, July 11, at Royal Sports, 750 Pembina Hwy. Then challenge your colleagues or a local office to beat your best score that Saturday or beat your team’s donation to Five Hole For Food benefitting Siloam Mission. Use social media to spur the fun and competition. Our hashtag is #FHFF.

DONATE AT THE TILL

As of June 18, donations will be accepted at all tills at London Drugs St. Vital. Customers will also have the option to buy a pre-built bag of food at a cost of $25. After the customer has purchased the bag, it will be given to Siloam Mission on July 11. On July 12, the bags will no longer be sold at London Drugs, but donations can still be made at stores till until end of business on July 18.

If you have any questions or want to join the street hockey team please reach out to Richard at FHFF richard@fiveholeforfood.com.

 

 

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Leadership Winnipeg Through the Eyes of Allison Langridge

by Admin 9. June 2015 07:57

 

Plug in together, and make it personal

Regardless of our personal level of media consumption and whether we choose TV, web, print or radio, how fortunate we are to have access to news, views and – paraphrasing Margaret Mead – a small group of committed citizens effecting change. Visiting with a selection of local media outlets during the June 5 Leadership Winnipeg session reinforced this. 

Look way up

The 30th  floor of 200 Portage – Global Winnipeg headquarters – offers not only a breathtaking and by-the-minute view of what’s taking shape in our city, but also an inside view of how news comes together in a moment-to-moment mesh of improvisation, planning, solo effort and undeniable teamwork.

The Global team’s commitment to being on top (literally and figuratively!) of what’s unfolding around us at all times is an inspiring nudge for each of us to be regularly in tune with our life and times in order to be a trusted, informed and well-rounded source, a wise leader.

Get grounded

Taking a ground-level approach (also literally and figuratively), the Free Press and Community News Commons get hands-on in the Exchange with local journalism alongside citizens and organizations. Teamwork and solo efforts mesh again, in planned and improvised ways.  

Prioritizing a daily news habit – regardless of our culture’s over-committed schedules – was a timeless takeaway from visiting with CNC and WFP. You can never have too many perspectives to learn from.

Savour the memories

Teaming up and plugging in for the benefit of our city can also come somewhere in between ground-level and a sky-high vantage point. Tapping into yesteryear, while making a relevant present-day personal and emotional impact for its audience, CJNU leads in Winnipeg with nostalgia radio. While their playlist is specific, their hook and impact is irrefutable: listeners want to connect with the hosts and memories as a means of feeling tuned in to the community.

And from an overall leadership perspective, we’re arguably in a better position to understand our community, take the lead and make change happen, when we connect with our fellow citizens, surroundings and share our stories.

 

 

 

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Meet One of Our Chamber Members

by Admin 27. March 2015 05:56

We are pleased to introduce one of our Chamber members, Robert Lowdon of Robert Lowdon Photography

What does your company do?

Our company (Robert Lowdon Photography) provides top-level commercial photography services for companies both large and small. This includes advertising, major events, products, commercial interiors, corporate and more. So basically, everything a business would need to showcase itself visually.

I also have a strong art side of the business and provide fine art photographs on a retail level. My artwork is sold through venues such as the Winnipeg Art Gallery, among others.

What company or business person most inspires you?

I really don't think I can limit this to one person or business. So here is a short list, and I apologize if I miss anyone.

Brian Bowman because he really wants our community to be the best in world, and he'll do it. Jodi Moskal because she is awesome, and never afraid to be herself.

Red River College because they are producing some of the most talented people you could ever hire. Startup Winnipeg because they are creating so many great new entrepreneurs and businesses. Downtown Winnipeg BIZ because they have accomplished so much for Winnipeg and continue to do more. The Winnipeg Art Gallery because they make me proud to live here, and how about everybody involved in The Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce because they challenge this city to be a better place for everyone.

How did you get the idea for your business or why did you choose to go into this business?

Well, that is a bit tricky. I didn't really follow the traditional approach to starting a business. One day, I just decided I wanted to live my life on my own terms. I had always loved photography and to some degree I am naturally talented at it … minus all the hard work, of course. So in 2010, I decided to switch to Red River College and enrolled in their Professional Photography program. After graduating in 2011, I decided that since I now have this training and qualifications, I might as well start a business. 

Basically for the past five years, I've just been adding goals I would like to achieve in my professional life, and checking them off one-by-one … surprisingly, a lot faster than I ever thought would be possible.

What is innovative about your business?

The work we are able to provide to our clients. I tend to pride myself on creating imagery vastly different from what everyone else is doing. I'm not content with just simply taking photographs. Every time I want it to be the best work I've ever done.

How we have really embraced technology. All of our client files are delivered digitally to multiple points throughout North America. Our client's images are stored digitally using Cloud software and can be accessed at anytime. Artwork (prints) generally can be produced and delivered to any point in North America in less than 24 hours. All of our paperwork is electronic - contracts, invoicing, everything. I've created this business that produces almost no waste whatsoever and that is really important to me. Ironically, the only thing we print is artwork.

To the future, I've been working on a few things that I think might really shake things up. Having the frame of mind to constantly exceed our client's expectations, and even our own is what moves me forward. 

What’s the most difficult part of your job?

My schedule is probably the hardest part. Some nights, I might be photographing an event until one in the morning. Then I'm up at 4 a.m. to photograph sunrise shots, plus a bunch of other shoots during the day. So, it's a sleep-when-you-can type of scenario right now. 

What is the most important issue facing business today?  

I think how fast everything is moving is really impacting a lot of businesses right now. Change happens so quickly and if you're not out in front, you're getting left behind.

Why did you join The Chamber?

I joined The Chamber because I really wanted to take the time to learn from other business professionals. I'm still pretty young, so I try to take lessons from every experience I have. Of course, the added sales and exposure we get from The Chamber are also a plus. 

 

YOU'RE INVITED:

When: Friday, April 3, 5-9 p.m.
Where: 245 McDermot Ave. - 4th Floor Classroom

Robert is hosting an art show, a series of photographs documenting how humans interact with our ever changing landscape and the cyclical relationship of our environment and the conflicts that lie within that marriage. Please join him.

For more information, go to:

http://www.creativemanitoba.ca/news-events/events/aci-events/display,event/1959/april-first-friday-robert-lowdon-s-one-night-only 

 

 

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Leadership Winnipeg Through the Eyes of Sarah Scott

by Admin 23. March 2015 10:23

                                             - "Inspired to connect deeper within our communities."

On March 13, the Leadership Winnipeg class met at Western Canada's first university – the University of Manitoba. Learning that Winnipeg had the first university in Western Canada was an eye opener; just one of many to come. Winnipeg has a rich history. While not well-known to the general public, the things I learned as a part of Leadership Winnipeg, further heightened my belief in this city, ultimately making me prouder than ever to be a born and raised a Winnipegger.

The resounding theme to the day was that each individual who spoke to us was an expert in their respective field. Each individual exuded passion and a true love for their profession. As a young leader, I felt inspired. This inspiration has driven me to reach further into my potential and find out exactly what my true passion is. I will then take this knowledge and use it to become an expert within my findings.

The morning part of the class included talks from Tyler MacAfee, Dr. David Barnard, John Kearsey, Dr. Digvir Jayas and Dr. Peter Jones. 

Dr. David Barnard shared some facts and current initiatives of the university and left us with his idea of what a leader is. Dr. Barnard said: “Leaders are people who will take you to a place where you wouldn’t have gone before.” This way of thinking challenges my current beliefs in a positive way. As I think more and more about it, I believe it to be bang-on to what a leader should be for the people they are leading.

John Kearsey shared his thoughts on leaders and said: “Leaders step up and lean in.” John spoke to us on a variety of topics. By far the most memorable was around the university’s long-term marketing campaign called “Trailblazer.” This campaign was created to help change the perception of the university. The campaign uses the words “Trailblazers,” “Rebels,” “Explorers,” “Visionaries” and “Challengers” with phrases like “Find your Focus,” “Design your World,” “Discover your Voice,” “Change the Rules” and “Express your Truth.” These words and phrases are meant to show a storied history of positioning individuals for outstanding achievements through the University of Manitoba.  More details on the campaign can be found here: http://umanitoba.ca/trailblazer/index.html

As lunch hour approached, we were put into small groups for a “Conversation over Lunch.” The idea was to talk in small groups about how the presence of racism affects the relationship between indigenous and non-indigenous people. The University of Manitoba brought in indigenous faculty members Deborah Young and Ry Moran as well as indigenous students and researchers to engage in conversation with us around this topic. This led to a very interesting and real conversation between the various groups. Each spoke up about their opinions, emotions and ideas about the topic. Ideas were shared about what can be done not only today, but just as important, tomorrow to help with the very real issues we face around racism in Winnipeg and in Canada. Our group agreed that for the general population of Winnipeg, education needs to be brought to the forefront and made accessible. We also came up with the idea of a “buddy program.” This program would allow adults of indigenous and non-indigenous backgrounds to be paired up to get together once per week to share their community’s story, history, positive points and struggles. We thought a program like this would help the separated communities of our great city understand other areas of Winnipeg, thus giving an opportunity to better our city and attitudes towards one another. I felt so inspired by this conversation, I went on the www.1winnipeg.ca site created by our Mayor’s Office and shared our idea as an initiative for Winnipeg to help combat racism.

The afternoon involved a panel discussion with members of the “University of Manitoba’s Impact in the Community Group” and a couple of tours around campus. The panel of individuals included: Steve Kirby, Nusraat Masood and Coach Brian Dobie.

Steve Kirby spoke to us about the “Jazz on Wheels” program - a mobile, inner-city jazz education performance program. He spoke to us about the impact that jazz had on him while growing up in a rough community. This community typically had little hope for its members and unfortunately Steve shared that very few of the people amounted to anything. As Steve put it: “I grew up on the wrong side of the tracks.” He spoke about how jazz music is a culture and because of that, it makes people look objectively at music as a language. By putting on “Jazz on Wheels,” he believes it has a very positive and impactful message to kids in all walks of life.

Nusraat Masood shared about the WISE program and “Adopt a Class” program. These programs are designed to bring women and indigenous people together to learn more about and to create a diverse science and engineering environment for the future.

Coach Brian Dobie shared information on “Bison’s against Bullying” and how that program is used to teach kids the impact of bullying and its effects on others. The program has the Bison players sharing their real life stories with the kids about how they were bullied or how they bullied others and how it shaped them. Brian Dobie shared with us that to be an impactful person in your community, career or personal life, “it’s about who you are, not what you are.”

In closing, I find that month-by-month each Leadership Winnipeg class challenges me and inspires me to be involved more within our city. From this class, it is clear to me that the University of Manitoba shares a message that the universe is designed to make a success out of us, and our choices will dictate where we go from here.

 

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Leadership Winnipeg Through the Eyes of Michael Badejo

by Chamber Staff 19. March 2015 05:57

For those less familiar with the program, Leadership Winnipeg (in part) is a highlight reel of every dimension that Winnipeg has to offer. Although that might imply brevity or lack of depth, the program offers the opposite – it is a very thorough look at what some choose to quickly overlook: the absolute necessity in the web of connected organizations that make Winnipeg the unique city that it is. On March 13, the Leadership Winnipeg group was stationed at a core Winnipeg (and Manitoba) staple – the University of Manitoba.  

The day began with a great welcome, introductions and overview from Dr. David Barnard (president and vice-chancellor of the university) as well as John Kearsey (vice-president External) and Tyler MacAfee (director of Government and Community Engagement). Although most would be able to tell you that the University of Manitoba plays a pivotal part in leading Winnipeg’s educational development, they also reinforced the scope of the university on the local as well as global stage. The presentations from leading graduate students as well as Dr. Digvir Jayas (vice-president Research and International) also elaborated on the importance and capacity that the U of M has for pushing global society forward from a research perspective. 

We were also treated to a tour of the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, led by director Dr. Peter Jones. It was illuminating for those of us who were unaware of just how much science goes into what we pick up in a grocery store.

Following that, Deborah Young, Ry Moran, as well as a handful of Indigenous students and researchers captivated the group with an emphatic look at community and race issues within Winnipeg. This led to substantial discussion about the very real issues – both past and present – facing our city and how we can move forward in the face of them. A community panel discussion with Steve Kirby, Roger Bennington, Nusraat Masood and Brian Dobie on the U of M’s impact in the community was also great in that they laid out some specific examples of how the U of M breaks down barriers and builds leaders from within, whether as musicians, budding CanU students, WISE program attendees, or student athletes.

The day was capped by a tour of the McQuade Structures Lab and the Hydrology Testing and Research Facility. From the community and research side with its potential for future growth to the very tangible and immediate benefits that the U of M can, will and does provide to Winnipeg, all in attendance had a first-hand look at how the University of Manitoba shapes leaders of the now and the future. As an icon of the city and the province, it is a firmly entrenched part of leadership within Winnipeg.

 

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New Members Meet Old at Chamber Orientation

by Chamber Staff 12. March 2015 12:40

The sun had yet to rise when they arrived, but no one was left out in the dark as Fort Whyte Alive welcomed nearly 50 people to our New Member Orientation on March 12.

Even the geese were still asleep, but indoors it was lively as we learned the ABCs of Networking (A for Attend, B for Be a Host and C for Connect or Contact). Everyone then put what they learned into practice. The decibel level rose and event organizers were hard-pressed to quiet the discussion when it was time to resume the program. Chamber Ambassadors, new members and staff were introduced and Ambassadors talked about why they joined The Chamber and what The Chamber has to offer.

There were a lot of smiles and lots of laughter. There was good food and good conversation before the morning was over. 

         

   

             

   

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Assiniboine Park Conservancy

by Admin 10. March 2015 12:33

SPIRIT OF WINNIPEG AWARDS FINALIST – NOT-FOR-PROFIT CATEGORY

 


Journey to Churchill is the exciting all-new, world-class, 10-acre northern species signature exhibit within the Assiniboine Park Zoo. Home to polar bears, muskoxen, Arctic fox, wolves, seals and snowy owls, Journey to Churchill offers visitors a viewing experience with no visible barriers, interactive and dynamic interpretive components and more naturalistic landscapes.

Since opening the doors to Journey to Churchill in July 2014, the Zoo has seen a dramatic increase in visitation with Winnipeggers and visitors alike lining up to explore this incredible new attraction. The Zoo has had its busiest winter in over a decade with more than 10,000 visitors during the month of December – proving that Manitobans are a hearty, winter-loving bunch.

As our visitors continue to see, Journey to Churchill represents an entirely new experience that is uniquely Manitoban and reflects incredibly well on our city. Highlights of the world-class exhibit include: the Aurora Borealis Theatre, Manitoba’s largest 360-degree domed theatre; the Sea Ice Passage, otherwise known as the underwater viewing tunnels, where visitors are wowed as they watch majestic polar bears swim and play above and around them; the Tundra Grill, where visitors can enjoy grabbing a bite to eat while they look through a 150-foot-wide wall of nine-foot-high windows while polar bears roam the Churchill Coast and tundra-like landscape. There is so much to enjoy at Journey to Churchill and it can translate into a remarkably memorable experience for all visitors.

Journey to Churchill has created a must-see tourist destination in the Assiniboine Park Zoo, cementing itself at the top of the list of reasons to visit Winnipeg. The evolving brand of the Assiniboine Park Zoo also includes the International Polar Bear Conservation Centre (IPBCC), which is an integral piece of the Journey to Churchill project. The IPBCC is a research, education and conservation hub focusing specifically on northern species. It also serves as a rescue and transition centre for polar bear cubs that have no hope for survival on their own in the wild. This will give us the opportunity to further establish Manitoba as the Polar Bear Capital of the World, thereby contributing to the growth of our tourism industry both on a short and long–term basis.

Journey to Churchill was always intended to be so much more than a zoo exhibit – it was intended to raise the bar as a source of pride for our community. We wanted to showcase it to the world, and in a very short time, we have done just that.
 

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Meet One of Our Newest Members

by Chamber Staff 9. March 2015 08:32

 

We are pleased to introduce one of our Chamber members, Manny Sousa of Manuel F. Sousa Photography

What does your company do?

We take photographs - shooting corporate events, headshots, weddings, bar mitzvahs, parties and family portraits.

What company or business person most inspires you?

I’d have to say Izzy Asper because I got to meet him and his family. He was one of the first people in Winnipeg I got to shoot. He was a smart man in business, but not only that, he gave back to the community.

How did you get the idea for your business or why did you choose to go into this business?

I loved looking at National Geographic magazines and I dreamed of being able to take pictures like that. I started playing around with my camera, taking lots of pictures. I was encouraged by others to pursue photography. When I moved to Winnipeg in 1992, I decided to try making a full-time living doing photography.

What is innovative about your business?

I’m constantly seeking the latest and greatest, and attend an annual trade show in Las Vegas, which features the best photography in the world and keeps me up-to-date with new technologies.

I am introducing to the local market a “live” social booth, that’s not at all like the old box-type photo booth. This booth has a backdrop or green screen (with magazine and movie poster templates), a 24” touch screen monitor, which tells you what to do, and a printer that can produce a print in 10 seconds. You can also post the photo right on the spot to Facebook or text or email it. “It’s freaky good.”

I’ve brought the booth to corporate parties and weddings, where it’s proven a highlight of the party.

What’s the most difficult part of your job?

Educating my customers so they know what their images could look like. I encourage them to come to my studio, where I can show them proper lighting and a bit about post-processing of an image, so they know what makes an image a great image.

What’s the most important issue facing business today?

Creating a city that has more character by having more independent businesses.

Why did you join The Chamber?

To network and have an opportunity to let members know what I have to offer. I also want to give back to city and help out where I can because I believe that this is one great city!

 

 

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Piccola Cucina

by Admin 3. March 2015 07:19

SPIRIT OF WINNIPEG AWARDS FINALIST - SMALL BUSINESS CATEGORY

   

Piccola Cucina, a family business, is a premier manufacturer of gourmet, handcrafted, almond-based foods. The artisan products of this mother and daughter team are made with the utmost of care and attention, manufactured in a gluten-free facility.

Products include a line of Italian macaroons and sweet pie shells that are vegetarian, low in sodium and free from gluten, dairy, grains, soy, corn and yeast. In addition to their sweet pie shells, they have unsweetened, low-sodium, vegan, multi-purpose pie shells, free from gluten, dairy, soy, corn and yeast.

Piccola Cucina took its inspiration from the family’s Italian roots and traditional recipes, where almonds have always been a main ingredient, both in baking and in main dishes. It all began with the traditional amaretti cookies, an Italian-style macaroon, made with the simplest of ingredients - almonds, egg whites, sugar and natural flavouring. Piccola Cucina now manufactures six different flavoured, Italian-inspired almond macaroons - Amaretti, Chocoretti, Pistachioretti, Limonetti, Coconutti and Walnutti.

A couple of years ago, Piccola Cucina developed a sweet almond pie shell using the same simple macaroon ingredients. The high-flavour, high-texture impact is perfect for sweet fillings, from custards to fruit pies to cheese cakes … essentially any traditional filling with an elevated flavour profile. This pie shell won’t get soggy or mushy and can withstand a filling for up to five days.

Piccola Cucina is revolutionizing the way pies are made and enjoyed. Over the past six months, in response to customer feedback, an unsweetened, vegan version of the almond pie shell was developed in conjunction with the Food Development Centre, incorporating golden Manitoba flax as the binding agent. This crust is the perfect vessel for savoury dishes, such as deep dish pizza, meat pies and quiches.

Currently, nothing like this exists in the marketplace. Almonds are the star ingredient in Piccola Cucina products, making them a perfect overall healthful, wholesome and great-tasting alternative.

Piccola Cucina`s mission is to create divine Italian products for the gourmet consumer of discriminating tastes.

 

 

 

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SageTea Software

by Admin 3. March 2015 06:34

SPIRIT OF WINNIPEG AWARDS FINALIST - START-UP CATEGORY

SageTea Software is the brain-child of Winnipegger David Long. David graduated from St. Johns Ravenscourt in 1990 and went on to do a degree in computer mathematics at Carleton University. He eventually moved to New York. He says that after 9/11, he was afforded lots of time to reflect, and this was when he worked out his mathematical concept for “SAGETEA.”

The SAGETEA concept is what drives the company’s unique Text to Software® tool. It is a revolutionary way to perform programming that uses only seven database tables rather than the hundreds or thousands currently used in programming. This radical approach means that the time and labour required to create software is reduced by more than half. The process also uses Natural Language Programming – English or any other Western language - rather than computer coding languages such as HTML, thus hugely reducing the probability of coding errors. Both were game-changers and David knew that he was on to something.

David teamed up with Scott MacGregor, an MBA grad, whom he met on a work project in the Caribbean.  The two men felt they had the right stuff to start their own company and SageTea Software was formed. 

The next couple of years saw the usual challenges faced by tech startups. Yet, with a loyal group of programmers and a record amount of friends and family investment – including many investors from Winnipeg - SageTea flourished. 

Around this time, David’s brother Alex, a senior sales rep in Winnipeg, joined the team as vice-president of sales. His ability to connect with people has made SageTea Software known throughout Winnipeg, particularly in the medical fields. Companies such as Blackberry, General Dynamics, Xerox and Ricoh, as well as Public Works and Government Services Canada, also lined up to do business with SageTea. 

Text to Software® is a unique product that makes it quick and easy way to create applications. To prove just how easy, SageTea used its software automation tool to create a number of sophisticated medical applications, as well as a warehouse application. Each application was tailored to the client’s unique specifications and can be further customized within hours to respond to evolving client needs or to meet the needs of new customers. 

Winnipeg has played a unique part in the creation and success of SageTea Software and we were honoured to be nominated by The Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce for the 2015 Spirit of Winnipeg Awards in the Start-Up Business category. Winnipeg is the conceptual birthplace of Text to Software®, the home of many of its investors and also many of its clients. 

The 2015 Spirit of Winnipeg Awards gala will be a wonderful event for the Winnipeg business community. SageTea Software offers its best regards to everyone who has been nominated and the team looks forward to seeing old – and new - friends at the event.  

 

 

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