Meet One of Our Newest Members

by Chamber Staff 30. October 2014 06:34

We are pleased to introduce one of our newest members, Deanna Hansen, founder and CEO, Fluid Isometrics

What does your company do?

Fluid Isometrics is a body-work system that melts through scar tissue and compressed connective tissue. We teach Fluid Isometrics block therapy classes and train and certify individuals as block therapy instructors. We have also created educational materials for people to access in the comfort of their home.

What company or business person most inspires you?

Jack Canfield, author of Chicken Soup for the Soul. He’s passionate about teaching others to find balance and success in all aspects of life. While reading his book “The Success Principles,” I felt he brought in a yogic philosophy to his teaching that inspired me to look further. I am currently enrolled in his coaching program, which offers the tools, personal assistance and accountability to ensure success in all endeavors.

How did you get the idea for your business or why did you choose to go into this business?

It was a fluke that changed and saved my life. I didn’t develop Fluid Isometrics, it developed me. It came to me over a number of years of self-application. I had a successful athletic therapy practice, but I was on a destructive path personally. In the depths of the scariest anxiety attack I have ever had, I dove my hand into my abdomen, only to discover it was full of pain and scar tissue. In that moment, I found a solution to my anxiety and a realization as to why I couldn’t lose the extra 50 pounds of weight I was carrying. That moment was the seed for what was to become Fluid Isometrics.


What’s the most difficult part of your job?

Teaching people that there is more than one way to view the body. We have been influenced by the status quo for so long that we believe what we are told without exception. Fluid Isometrics is a system that teaches that oxygen is the most important nutrient our cells require and we have the ability to pull in six times the amount when we breathe consciously. The frozen fascia that blocks blood and oxygen flow, however, needs to be melted to access the diaphragm muscle, which is responsible for proper breathing. Fluid Isometrics focuses on melting through these blocks, which accumulate through time causing pain, disease and the aging of tissue, and allow the body to access this very powerful muscle.

What’s the most important issue facing your business today?

Finding the resources and money to continue to educate and create materials. As a pioneer in this very competitive field, I have made it my life’s mission to teach this work and provide the information I have gained over the past 15 years. Being able to reach influential people, who will be an advocate for Fluid Isometrics, is my current focus. Providing proper research to validate my work and creating teaching tools and opportunities to educate all require much time and money. As a small business owner, it is taxing to take on this monumental mission.

Why did you join The Chamber?

To create opportunities to network and to find the resources available to help me move forward. I am so immersed in my work and introverted by nature, I need opportunities that will help me connect with people and companies that can assist me on my mission. I am excited about the future and the success that is ahead and to be a part of such a committed organization can only help to advance my goals.

 

 

 

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Meet One of Our Chamber Board Members - Jan Belanger

by Chamber Staff 24. October 2014 12:46

JAN BELANGER, Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life

Why did you get involved with The Chamber

I’ve been indirectly involved as co-chair of Leadership Winnipeg’s Advisory Network and have followed The Winnipeg Chamber’s leadership and evolution for many years. I was honoured to be asked to join the board a few years ago. 

What’s the one thing everyone needs to know about The Chamber or would be surprised by?

The Chamber provides so much more than membership privileges. It is a catalyst and facilitator for many local initiatives. Membership means access to and connecting with those who are moving issues forward in our city.

What’s the most important issue facing business?

As businesses and citizens, we need to ensure we are developing people and skill sets to shape our growth and prosperity. How do you align education systems, social and economic environments, and career opportunities to help advance the creators, thinkers, leaders and doers?   

What’s the best business/career advice you’ve ever received?

Take your work seriously, not yourself. 

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

Good question! That I’m full of surprises?

What do you love most about Winnipeg?

This is a city that reveals itself once you get involved. There’s a lot of depth and variety in a relatively compact centre. It’s cosmopolitan and cultural, accessible and connected. I appreciate the mix of different people, different perspectives.


 

 

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Meet One of Our Newest Members

by Chamber Staff 17. October 2014 08:07

We are pleased to introduce one of our newest members, Derek Rolstone, consultant, Knightsbridge Human Capital Solutions

What does your company do?

We prepare the newly unemployed for the emotional and physical hurdles of job search, while minimizing the reputational and legal blow-back for companies. Basically, we help companies say goodbye better and help ex-employees with the next chapter of their lives.

What company or business person most inspires you?

Tom Peters – he’s all about engagement and getting discretionary effort out of employees. He talks a lot about earning employee loyalty.

How did you get the idea for your business or why did you choose to go into this business?

Knightsbridge is a large company with 22 offices and 400 employees across Canada. Our presence in Winnipeg has been a bit more limited, so we brought onboard new people and are spreading the word about the kinds of services we have to help companies, including smaller organizations, which might not have an HR department, but want to make change.

What’s the most difficult part of your job?

Anytime you’re dealing with people who’ve lost their jobs, it’s a pretty stressful time. They just got bad news, it’s not easy, and you’re having to help them work through it. It’s rewarding, but challenging.

What’s the most important issue facing business today?

Turnover – many companies expect loyalty, but they don’t always provide their employees with job security or professional development. I think trust on both ends is at an all-time low. However, it’s an opportunity to build the relationship.

Why did you join The Chamber?

I want to be near Brian Bowman (chuckles).

 

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Meet One of Our Chamber Board Members - Jim Bell

by Chamber Staff 14. October 2014 08:40

 

Why did you get involved in The Chamber?

I saw the impact The Chamber could have on our city and I know some of the people on the board. It’s exciting to join them and to do something for our city in a small way.

What’s the one thing everyone needs to know about The Chamber or would be surprised by?

How much people in The Chamber care and how devoted they are to making our city a better place.

What’s the most important issue facing business?

Taxation. I understand taxation is part of life and business should pay its fair share, but we need to draw a line in the sand. Business drives the economy and grows our city, but taxation can be encumbering.

What’s the best business/career advice you’ve ever received?

To make a difference – find your passion and apply that to what you do in your career. It’s a guideline I try to think about every day.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

How competitive I am, even though people see me as laid back. I get this from my background in athletics. I like to put my best foot forward in any game and even in business. I like to play fair, but hard.

What do you love most about Winnipeg?

The people and the community, absolutely, that’s an easy question. The fans and the community are the wind at my back.

 

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Meet One of Our Newest Members

by Chamber Staff 10. October 2014 07:39

Anne Lindsey (left)                               Photo Courtesy:  Matea Tuhtar, The Manitoba Teacher Magazine

We are pleased to introduce one of our newest members, Anne Lindsey, executive director of LITE (Local Investment Toward Employment)

What does your organization do?

In the shortest terms, we raise money and give it away. But our mission as a foundation is to support inner-city community economic development. To do that, we support initiatives that provide jobs and training to people who face barriers to employment, such as newcomers with language challenges, people coming out of the justice system, at-risk youth, single moms without access to childcare and individuals with physical and intellectual challenges.

What company or business person most inspires you?

Aki Energy, a social enterprise here in our building. They are doing amazing work installing geothermal in First Nations communities. It’s also about creating jobs on-reserve and having a smaller ecological footprint – saving energy. There’s a gap there and these folks are working hard to fill it.

How did you get the idea for your organization or why did you choose to get involved?

I didn’t start LITE, but before I worked here, my family gave money to LITE because we felt it has an important mission. It works with a population that is generally under-served. The underlying goal is to go beyond the standard charity model. Charity is good, but LITE has more of an impact – providing jobs and training opportunities, which is what people need to get out of poverty in the first place.

What’s the most difficult part of your job?

I think people overall understand the mission and are very generous, but the challenge is to ensure we have adequate funding to support the organization itself, so we can keep doing what we do. The challenge is to ensure we have core funding.

What’s the most important issue facing our community today?

From the perspective of the work I do, I’d have to say it’s the growing income gap and the fact so many people in our wealthy country don’t have their basic needs met. Personally, I’d add that climate change is an important issue.

Why did you join The Chamber?

We want to expand knowledge of LITE in our community, and The Chamber offers an opportunity to network and to tell people what we do.

 

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Meet One of Our Chamber Board Members - Mark Saidi

by Chamber Staff 6. October 2014 10:18

Mark Saidi, RBC – Royal Bank of Canada

 

Why did you get involved in The Chamber?

To me, cities are built on businesses. I like being involved with an organization that helps shape that part. And there’s no better organization to do it than The Chamber.

What’s the one thing everyone needs to know about The Chamber or would be surprised by?

I was shocked to learn the number of events The Chamber does every year and also the reach The Chamber has within the community.

What’s the most important issue facing business?

Carving out a niche against your competitors and finding the talent to take advantage of that niche.

What’s the best business/career advice you’ve ever received?

Careers are a marathon, not a sprint.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

Nothing … I’m an open book. Well, maybe, that I’m a huge Miles Davis fan.

What do you love most about Winnipeg?

The summers … they’re so wonderful and valuable.

 

 

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10th Annual Excellence in Aboriginal Business Leadership Awards

by Chamber Staff 2. October 2014 12:34

                                           MEDO Pharmacy

Ten years ago, the germ of an idea – to recognize Aboriginal business leaders and profile their valuable contribution to Manitoba’s economy - resulted in the first annual Excellence in Aboriginal Business Leadership Awards.

On Thursday (Oct. 9), the University of Manitoba's Asper School of Business and Aboriginal Business Education Partners (ABEP) will host a celebration of the Awards' 10th anniversary. ABEP provides Aboriginal students pursuing a Bachelor of Commerce degree at the Asper School with a sense of community and a network of services, including scholarships and bursaries.

The awards dinner, being held at the RBC Convention Centre, begins at 5:30 p.m. Funds raised support Aboriginal students at the Asper School of Business.

“We're especially excited about this year's event because ABEP also happens to be celebrating its 20th anniversary," says Peter Pomart, ABEP's program co-ordinator. "We currently have 51 students in the program from first-year to graduating. The award recipients' stories of their challenges and successes will inspire the students to undertake their own journeys in business and leadership."

Close to 200 guests will be on-hand to recognize the two award recipients: Sagkeeng Superstore (Aboriginal Business Leadership Award) and the Metis Economic Development Organization (Excellence in Aboriginal Small and Medium Enterprises Award).

Sagkeeng Superstore

Since opening in 1990, the community-owned Sagkeeng Superstore has expanded to include 8,000 square feet of new space. The recent addition of a Tim Horton’s franchise has attracted new patrons. Over the past three years, the store's annual sales have grown to an average of nearly $5,000,000. The Superstore’s success demonstrates that First Nations are able to manage, grow and finance their businesses, and create employment and business opportunities for their members and surrounding communities.

Sagkeeng Superstore also demonstrates excellence in Aboriginal business leadership by donating to families in times of bereavement, to community events, and to youth sport and recreation programs. In collaboration with Social Development, the store has been involved in training social recipients and providing valuable work experience through part-time employment opportunities. In the future, Sagkeeng Superstore plans to develop a summer internship program for high school students, and give students the opportunity to gain credit for work done at the store.

Metis Economic Development Organization (MEDO)

The MEDO Care Pharmacy opened in December 2012 with a mandate to provide high-quality pharmacy services to the Metis people of Manitoba. Profits from MEDO Care’s business activities flow to the Metis government, enhancing its financial sustainability and helping it better serve Manitoba's Metis citizens.

The partnerships MEDO forms enables First Nations to take further ownership of their own health outcomes while retaining the profits from pharmacy operations. Those profits can then become discretionary funds to be used within the community. MEDO plans to provide exceptional care to a widening audience of Metis, First Nations and non-Aboriginal clients throughout Winnipeg and Manitoba.

MEDO Care Pharmacy is also involved in developing a Metis Employment and Training initiative to encourage Metis youth to train as Pharmacy Technicians. In partnership with the Manitoba Metis Federation’s Metis Employment and Training Department, MEDO Care will help facilitate access to post-secondary training, and provide potential opportunities for on-the-job practical training following course completion.

 

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Michael Legary Sworn-In as Chamber Chair

by Admin 2. October 2014 06:52

 

What’s your business background?

I was born and raised in an entrepreneurial family, which owned a number of businesses, including Grand Prix Amusements (go carts). Although I am only 34, I have had a real diverse work background - I have worked in retail, manufacturing, industrial, defence, software and government. I was working in government while in high school, having had an opportunity in the taxation and finance department to do security assessments because of my interest in information security. I now own a few private companies, the largest of which is Seccuris, which does information security. I am also involved in entrepreneurship support through AssentWorks and Ramp Up Manitoba.

How and why have you been involved in The Chamber?

I first got involved in The Chamber when I was starting Seccuris in 1999. As a start-up, I was looking to network and took part in the business mixers. I also took advantage of the employee benefits program. Then I got more involved with the policy committees. Slowly, I evolved from being a member for my own reasons – the benefits offered a small and growing business – to realizing the kind of influence The Chamber wields with respect to civic, provincial and federal issues that have an impact on all of us and that shape the business community. I was then asked to be on the board.

What’s the one thing everyone needs to know about The Chamber?

The most interesting thing is that The Chamber is a “community.” Most people look at The Chamber as a service provider, focused on policy. But The Chamber represents a diverse set of business and professional relationships. Your involvement is welcomed and desired. You shouldn’t wait to be invited to participate, you should make it yours.

What’s the best business advice you’ve ever received?

While you want to be passionate about your business, passion alone will not help you succeed.  You are not there just for personal reasons. You need a good fundamental business, a solid reason to grow your scalability – that’s what turns a four-person business into 400 or 4,000.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

That I’m an introvert. I have been speaking out on behalf of entrepreneurial start-ups and through The Chamber have been publicly involved in creating linkages, but I like nothing more than sitting down before a quiet fire by myself.

What’s your favourite thing about Winnipeg?

It’s the best example of what North America truly was and will become. Our native population has been here for many hundreds of years, and together we shaped a new community that’s survived and is stable, regardless of what others have done. Being in the true geographic centre of North America, we get a unique perspective on what’s happening from coast-to-coast and across the U.S. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is a perfect example of influence turning into action in the centre of Canada. We have a diversity of medium businesses that are turning into big businesses. We’re growing as ourselves, doing things differently than others. CentrePort could not have happened anywhere else but here.

What are you most looking forward to during your year as chair?

A big thing for me is bringing a new focus on dialogue within The Chamber communities. I have had the luxury of working with amazing young businesses and startups, as well as some of the businesses that represent the old bricks and mortar. I want to link the two together and look at how we can create innovation within all businesses. We need to determine what tools we have, but don’t know we have.

SHORT SNAPPERS

Which do you prefer – tea or coffee?

Tea - I can drink it all day. I’m hooked because of my English heritage.

Which do you prefer – cats or dogs?

Cats.

Top movie of all time?

Hackers.

Favourite song?

The Drinking Song – Moxy Fruvous

Stuck on an island, what are your three must-haves?

A knife, some tobacco seeds and a good chair.

Winnipeg’s best-kept secret?

Our entrepreneurial support community – there are at least 40 entities that help growing, start-up, young businesses, such as CYBF, the Women’s Enterprise Centre and the Composites Innovation Centre.

My BOLD idea?

Innovation Alley – establishing the West Exchange as a true collaborative community for business, technology, art and education. It’s basically the concept of a creative campus, where we can bring the next generation of scalable business to Winnipeg and enable the ones already here.

 

 

 

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Meet Mayoral Candidate David Sanders

by Chamber Staff 29. August 2014 10:57

Winnipeggers are prepared to pay more for city services, but city council will not get their support because they have lost the public trust, mayoral candidate David Sanders told the BOLD Winnipeg caucus.

“I’m concerned. We must rebuild, re-earn that trust,” Sanders said, indicating he started showing up at City Hall because he was disturbed at the decision-making.

“If you look in the Decision Making Information System, my name comes up 574 times. Personally, I’m trying to create a city that works. I believe I can do the best job.”

A former journalist, lawyer, certified management consultant and deputy minister of urban affairs, Sanders said he’s been following what’s been happening at City Hall since 1965.

More recently, he’s been making presentations at City Hall, hoping the media would pick up on the issues and start questioning things, he said.

“We need to be more open. We can learn a whole lot from everybody else’s mistakes and successes. It’s too easy to say: ‘To hell with it.’ I’m trying to make a difference.”

He said he is in full support of rapid transit and the leg out to the University of Manitoba, but he is opposed to the Parker lands route.

“Dillon should stop work … while we review the case and various options. We should take a little longer and do the right thing.”

When asked about the BOLD idea of a municipal income tax, he said he would not rule it out.

“It’s constructive to encourage serious debate. I’m open to changing things.”

He added that many people do not understand the scope of our current infrastructure problem.

The problem is not just the roads, but water and sewer as well.

“We need to understand the type of community we want and find a way to finance it. We need to research well,” he said.

 

 

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Meet One of Our Newest Members

by Chamber Staff 21. August 2014 11:19

We are pleased to introduce one of our newest members,Guy Sinclaire, owner of Cardioscreens.com

What does your company do?

We’re a mobile service that does cardiovascular screening right in a person’s home or office. Cardiovascular screening is done across the border, but not normally in Canada because our healthcare system is not as focused on prevention. The technology itself is more than 20 years old.

Approved by Health Canada, the medical device is portable - about the size of a fax machine. A finger probe provides information on the condition of your arteries/capillaries, of which there are more than 60,000 miles in the body.

I’m certified as a technician by a well-known naturopathic doctor. I don’t diagnose, but I can say what has worked for me. I’m also starting to sell the machines, which cost about $8,000, and to train more people on their use.

What company or business person most inspires you?

I’m attracted to people who are enthusiastic about being healthy.

How did you get the idea for your business or why did you choose to go into this business?

I’ve always been concerned about bettering my health and preventing health issues through natural means. Last year, I asked my doctor about the condition of my arteries – he replied that I looked good and not to worry. Meanwhile, a fitness trainer I knew was told by his doctor that he was in perfect health and a month later, he had a massive heart attack. If my machine can alert people to a problem, they can work at correcting the problem naturally and come back in 90 days to see if things are improving.

What’s the most difficult part of your job?

Talking to people who aren’t well and telling them what I do, but they have no interest. It’s frustrating.

What’s the most important issue facing business today?

Stress. A lot of people don’t know how to handle stress and end up going on medication, which is just a bandaid … it doesn’t fix anything.

Why did you join The Chamber?

I know there are a lot of business people who could use my services, but they don’t know where to go. I like meeting new people and being part of the business community. I like being plugged into Winnipeg.

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